BBC Earth

5 Feb. 2023
4 Feb. 2023
3 Feb. 2023
2 Feb. 2023
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31 Jan. 2023
29 Jan. 2023

BBC Science & Environment

5 Feb. 2023
Wetlands are being lost at a faster rate than forests, but in some regions beavers are part of the solution.
2 Feb. 2023
Scientists will monitor the virus, but UK health chiefs say the risk to the public is very low.
2 Feb. 2023
The UK hasn't seen a single named storm so far this autumn and winter. But why?
1 Feb. 2023
A Viking leader probably chose his favourite animals to board a longboat to England, scientists say.
1 Feb. 2023
The cosmic ball of ice and dust is about to make its closest approach to our planet.
1 Feb. 2023
The Royal Society calls for the delivery of a UK-wide land-use framework to clear up confusion.
1 Feb. 2023
The tightening of regulations may lead to criminal records for those flouting them, a new policy says.

Mashable

5 Feb. 2023
With King Charles III's coronation right around the corner, SNL thought it best to seek the expertise of real Brits. When British rappers Milly Pounds and Shirty (James Austin Johnson and Devon [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Bowen Yang has practically made a career out of playing objects and insects (the iceberg that sank the Titanic, the spotted lantern fly) and this week he returned to the SNL stage as a particularly [...]
5 Feb. 2023
What makes Saturday Night Live's Lisa from Temecula sketch so funny, isn't the material itself. It's that everyone in the sketch from Nwodim to host Pedro Pascal can't hold character the entire [...]
5 Feb. 2023
It seems the success of HBO's The Last of Us has gotten to the heads of the executives, who are now making plans to reimagine another hugely popular video game into a gritty psychological drama. And [...]
5 Feb. 2023
TL;DR: As of Feb. 5, you can score a Nationwide Players Pass Annual Golf Membership and a $50 Restaurant.com eGift card for only $49 — that's a 75% discount from the usual value.It’s [...]
5 Feb. 2023
TL;DR: As of Feb. 5, you can pick up a refurbished Microsoft Surface 3 Tablet for only $159.99 instead of $594 — that's 73% in savings.Whether we like it or not, multitasking is a necessary [...]
5 Feb. 2023
TL;DR: As of Feb. 5, you can get a lifetime subscription to the Jillian Michaels Fitness App for just $179 instead of $449.95. That's a 60% price drop for a limited time.As much as it’d be [...]

Lex Fridman

2 Feb. 2023
28 Jan. 2023
25 Jan. 2023
21 Jan. 2023
17 Jan. 2023
11 Jan. 2023
8 Jan. 2023

Lex Fridman Podcast

2 Feb. 2023
Tim Dodd is host of the Everyday Astronaut YouTube channel, where he teaches about rocket engines and all things space travel. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – [...]
28 Jan. 2023
David Kipping is an astronomer at Columbia University, director of the Cool Worlds Lab, and host of the Cool Worlds YouTube channel. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – [...]
25 Jan. 2023
Jeremi Suri is a historian at UT Austin. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Eight Sleep: https://www.eightsleep.com/lex to get special savings – BetterHelp: [...]
21 Jan. 2023
Dennis Whyte is a nuclear scientist at MIT and the director of the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Rocket Money: [...]
17 Jan. 2023
Imam Omar Suleiman is the Founder and President of the Yaqeen Institute for Islamic Research and a professor of Islamic Studies at Southern Methodist University. Please support this podcast by [...]
11 Jan. 2023
MrBeast is a legendary YouTube creator. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – House of Macadamias: https://houseofmacadamias.com/lex and use code LEX to get 20% off your [...]
29 Dec. 2022
Betül Kaçar is an astrobiologist at University of Wisconsin. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – House of Macadamias: https://houseofmacadamias.com/lex and use code [...]

TED Radio Hour

3 Feb. 2023
Original broadcast date: May 6, 2022. MLK Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin are household names, but what about their mothers? This hour, author Anna Malaika Tubbs explores how these three women [...]
27 Jan. 2023
Information feels more accessible than ever, but the ways we store data are surprisingly fragile. Can we save anything forever? This hour, TED speakers explore preserving our past, present and [...]
20 Jan. 2023
Original broadcast date: April 8, 2022. Giving and receiving care—it's a natural part of life. But how do we offer the best possible support for our loved ones? This hour, TED speakers share ideas [...]
13 Jan. 2023
Resolutions are easy to make, even easier to break. But what if a story or idea can motivate us in a whole new way? This hour, TED speakers offer different perspectives on our most common [...]
6 Jan. 2023
Original broadcast date: Friday, May 20, 2022. "Reduce, reuse, recycle." We've heard that for decades - but does it work? This hour, TED speakers reimagine the well-known slogan and reconsider how we [...]
30 Dec. 2022
Original broadcast date: June 17, 2022. Musician Jacob Collier is known for his electrifying performances and thoughtful views on art and humanity. This hour, Jacob joins us for a conversation on the [...]
28 Dec. 2022
As a special bonus, we're sharing an episode from a new TED podcast, ReThinking with Adam Grant. Adam joins neuroscientist Chantel Prat, who dispels what you thought you knew about your brain.

Knowable Magazine

2 Feb. 2023
This year marks 2,000 years since the birth of the Roman author of the first natural encyclopedia
31 Jan. 2023
Hundreds of these cannabis-related chemicals now exist, both natural and synthetic, inspiring researchers in search of medical breakthroughs — and fueling a dangerous trend in recreational use
25 Jan. 2023
OPINION: It’s sustainable, nutritious and delicious. Scientists need to ramp up efforts to meet this urgent need.
24 Jan. 2023
From the Big Bang to dark energy, knowledge of the cosmos has sped up in the past century — but big questions linger
19 Jan. 2023
Paleogenomic research has expanded rapidly over the past two decades, igniting heated debate about handling remains. Who gives consent for study participants long gone — and who should speak [...]
18 Jan. 2023
The liquid that our mouths produce isn’t just a lubricant. It plays an active role in how we perceive taste and can influence what we choose to eat, researchers are discovering.
17 Jan. 2023
The technology could transform how growers protect their harvests, by detecting plant diseases very early on. But the challenge is to develop tools that are as affordable as they are effective.

Latest articles | smithsonianmag.com

3 Feb. 2023
The sculpture, based on the famous Chicago landmark, had been under construction for years
3 Feb. 2023
It looks like a white powder and has nearly the same density as liquid water
3 Feb. 2023
In its heyday, the 20th Century Limited was advertised as "the most famous train in the world"
3 Feb. 2023
The renowned filmmaker had been arrested in July when authorities reactivated a 2010 sentence
3 Feb. 2023
In just a few weeks, the zoo has had enclosures tampered with, a clouded leopard escape, two stolen monkeys and a suspicious vulture death
3 Feb. 2023
Look beyond the soaring skyscrapers to find a confluence of cultures, traditions, languages and cuisines at the heart of this dazzling country
3 Feb. 2023
Meat from the gigantic animals could have fed hundreds of hominids, according to a new analysis of bones found in central Germany

Nautilus

3 Feb. 2023
More than a decade ago, a team of scientists decided they wanted to shoot neutrinos from Fermilab outside Chicago to a target buried in an abandoned gold mine 810 miles away. It was a big idea, one [...]
1 Feb. 2023
In 1879, the German botanist Anton de Bary coined the term symbiosis. People usually think of symbiosis in terms of mutually beneficial relationships, but scientifically it’s a catch-all for any [...]
1 Feb. 2023
When I first heard it, it sounded like a brief, blustery outtake. A momentary lull in an outdoor event captured by an old camcorder. A sonic slice of a windy afternoon anywhere on Earth. The [...]
1 Feb. 2023
When Summer Praetorius, author of this issue’s cover story, shared this photo of her brother, Jebsen, with me, I was enchanted beyond belief. It’s like a Norman Rockwell painting, I told her. It [...]
30 Jan. 2023
One question for Jon Rueda, a Ph.D. candidate and La Caixa INPhINIT Fellow at the University of Granada, where he studies the intersection between bioethics, ethics of emerging technologies, and [...]
27 Jan. 2023
For most of the year, Iceberg Alley is gray and cold. The largest city on its shores, St. John’s, is known as “Canada’s Weather Champion.” Among major Canadian cities, the capital of [...]
25 Jan. 2023
George Church looks like he needs a nap. I’m talking to him on Zoom, and his eyelids have grown heavy, inclining toward slumber. Or maybe my mind is playing tricks on me. He assures me he is wide [...]

Science Magazine Podcast

2 Feb. 2023
On this week’s show: New clues to the chemicals used for mummification, and the benefits and barriers to smart toilets First up this week: What can we learn from a mummy factory? Contributing [...]
26 Jan. 2023
On this week’s show: When deer are scarce these wolves turn to sea otters, and chemical weathering of silicates acts as a geological thermostat First up on this week’s show we have a story about [...]
19 Jan. 2023
Statisticians fight bad numbers used in medical murder trials, and the state of allergy science First up on this week’s show, we have a piece on accusations of medical murder. Contributing [...]
12 Jan. 2023
Data on hazes and clouds may be key to understanding exoplanets, and NextGen letter writers share the upside of failure Hazes and clouds could keep exoplanets’ secrets hidden, unless researchers [...]
5 Jan. 2023
Keeping an eye on the largest hydroelectric project in the Amazon basin, and helping patients with deletions in their mitochondrial DNA We are starting off the new year with producer Kevin McLean and [...]
22 Dec. 2022
On this week’s show: A rundown of our favorite online news stories, and some of our favorite moments on the podcast this year This is our last show of the year and it’s a fun one! Dave Grimm, our [...]
15 Dec. 2022
On this week’s show: Science’s Breakthrough of the Year and runners-up, plus the top books in 2022 You might not be surprised by this year’s breakthrough, but hopefully you won’t guess all [...]

Science News

3 Feb. 2023
We’ve all heard that dogs are a man’s best friend, but our canine companions don’t make up the entirety of humankind’s friend circle. Humans have cooperated with wild animals throughout [...]
3 Feb. 2023
Call them plant motors. Or plant muscles. Tiny bulges of specialized cells in a mimosa plant can fold its feathery leaflets together in seconds, then relax — and do it again. A new look at [...]
3 Feb. 2023
Early man in America takes a step backward — Science News, January 27, 1973 “Early Americans lived among and hunted mammoth, camel, extinct horse and bison as far back as [...]
2 Feb. 2023
Ice cubes float in water because they’re less dense than the liquid. But a newfound type of ice has a density nearly equal to what’s in your water glass, researchers report in the Feb. 3 [...]
2 Feb. 2023
A newfound species of frog doesn’t ribbit. In fact, it doesn’t make any sound at all. Many frogs have unusual characteristics, from turning translucent to being clumsy jumpers (SN: [...]
2 Feb. 2023
Are your cats play fighting or fighting fur real? It turns out that certain behaviors in domestic cats could be telltale signs that an interaction is friendly, aggressive or something in [...]
1 Feb. 2023
Vikings brought horses and dogs to the British Isles from Scandinavia, a new study suggests. A chemical analysis of bone fragments from a cemetery in England provides the first solid [...]

ScienceAlert

5 Feb. 2023
You can't escape destiny.
5 Feb. 2023
H2whoa.
5 Feb. 2023
Just the tip of the iceberg.
4 Feb. 2023
In the desert, life depends on death.
4 Feb. 2023
A real gift.
4 Feb. 2023
Not that we needed an excuse to drink it.
4 Feb. 2023
An incredible story.

Scientific American

4 Feb. 2023
Science in meter and verse
4 Feb. 2023
An expert explains why it’s so odd that the suspected Chinese spy balloon can change course
3 Feb. 2023
President Joe Biden named an expert on paleoclimatology to a White House intelligence panel
3 Feb. 2023
New research links bat habitat destruction with the spillover of their viruses to humans
3 Feb. 2023
A mysterious portrait of the Virgin Mary and Jesus may have been painted by the master Raphael, facial recognition finds. But many art historians reject the claim
2 Feb. 2023
The transformative social change needed to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius isn’t happening fast enough, experts say in a new report
2 Feb. 2023
Some scientists say the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s suggestion of updating COVID vaccines each year, as happens with influenza vaccines, could boost uptake. But others are less convinced

Sky & Telescope

3 Feb. 2023
Comet ZTF is still near its brightest, moonlight and all. Around the Big and Little Dog Stars, trace out the stick-figure patterns of the big and little dogs. A ghostly unicorn haunts the inside of [...]
3 Feb. 2023
Terence Dickinson, Canadian astronomer and author of numerous popular books on astronomy, has passed away. The post Terence Dickinson (1943 – 2023) appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
2 Feb. 2023
NASA’s Lucy mission now has a new first target of opportunity, a main-belt asteroid it will visit this November. The post Lucy Mission Has a New Asteroid to Fly By appeared first on Sky & [...]
1 Feb. 2023
We explore Comet ZTF's remarkable trio of tails and share the latest news and photos. The post Understanding the Tails of Comet ZTF (C/2022 E3) appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
1 Feb. 2023
February 4th marks the midway point between Decemberʼs solstice and the March equinox. Celebrate that celestial milestone by getting outside to gaze in awe at the amazing array of bright stars [...]
31 Jan. 2023
The discovery of a dozen new moons for Jupiter makes the king of planets the king of moons, too — at least for now. The post Astronomers Find a Dozen More Moons for Jupiter appeared first on Sky [...]
27 Jan. 2023
Forget the hype and go outside to enjoy the real thing — a relatively bright comet you can see in binoculars from a dark sky. The post See Comet ZTF (C/2022 E3) Dash Between Big and Little Dippers [...]

space.com

5 Feb. 2023
A stunning new view of the Tarantula Nebula captures turbulent clouds of gas and dust swirling between young stars. [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Humanity faces greater existential threats than it did during the Cold War, according to the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists [...]
5 Feb. 2023
A huge filament of solar plasma has broken off the sun's surface and is circling its north pole like a vortex of powerful winds, but scientists have no clue what caused [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Crew-6 will head to the International Space Station after its Feb. 26 launch, but three of its four crewmembers are preparing for the next generation of missions to the [...]
5 Feb. 2023
February's Full Snow Moon rises on Sunday (Feb. 5) and will be the smallest full moon of the year due to the current position of the moon in its orbit. [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Thirty-five new astronauts joined the corps in 1978, among them women and people of color who reshaped the agency forever, a new book shows. [...]
5 Feb. 2023
An F-22 fighter jet destroyed a Chinese balloon with a Sidewinder missile on Saturday (Feb. 4) when the airship was over the Atlantic Ocean off the South Carolina coast. [...]

The Cassandra Dispatch

30 Jan. 2023
Ricky Gervais is the answer to the question: can a comedian be a science communicator? In this episode of physicist Lawrence Krauss' The Origins Podcast, Krauss talks to award-winning British [...]
15 Jan. 2023
Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.Carl Sagan's famous passage [...]
1 Jan. 2023
In this interview, AI researcher and podcaster Lex Fridman interviews Richard Dawkins. They cover a wide range of topics, from pondering if we live in a simulation to memes.Watch the video of the [...]
18 Dec. 2022
In this report produced in 1973 by the Yorkshire public television, Richard Feynman talks about the importance of original ideas.Another topic that comes up is simplicity. According to Feynman, [...]
4 Dec. 2022
Christopher Hitchens died over ten years ago in late 2011. This conversation between Richard Dawkins and Hitchens was recorded in October 2011 by Dawkins, however it was only released by him earlier [...]
18 Nov. 2022
Welcome to the first issue of The Cassandra Dispatch!The simple idea behind this newsletter is that I pick and send one video every two weeks that features a speech or discussion by a great science [...]

The Guardian: Science Weekly

2 Feb. 2023
This week the government published a major environmental improvement plan for England. It has pledged that every household will be within a 15-minute walk of green space or water, the restoration of [...]
31 Jan. 2023
This week star gazers will be hoping to catch sight of an exotic green comet that last passed by Earth 50,000 years ago. But, unlike the view our Neanderthal ancestors would have had, light pollution [...]
26 Jan. 2023
ChatGPT has been causing a stir since its launch last year. The chatbot’s ability to produce convincing essays, stories and even song lyrics has impressed users, and this week attracted a [...]
24 Jan. 2023
Last week, New Zealand’s prime minister Jacinda Ardern announced her resignation, saying that she “no longer had enough in the tank” to do the role justice. Madeleine Finlay speaks to cognitive [...]
19 Jan. 2023
Scientists have predicted the return of the El Niño climate phenomenon later this year. Its arrival will result in even higher global temperatures and supercharged extreme weather events. Ian Sample [...]
17 Jan. 2023
As the ninth series of ITV show Love Island kicked off yesterday, viewers may have noticed contestants’ perfectly straight, white teeth. But are there risks associated with achieving a flawless [...]
12 Jan. 2023
A UN report has found the Earth’s ozone layer is on course to be healed within the next 40 years. What was once humanity’s most feared environmental peril is now an example of how the world can [...]

World Science Festival

2 Feb. 2023
22 Dec. 2022
30 Nov. 2022
22 Nov. 2022
17 Nov. 2022
10 Nov. 2022
5 Oct. 2022

New Atlas

4 Feb. 2023
Not the average Mitsubishi Outlander, or the average camper van, the Outlander PHEV E:Pop is a pop-top camper wagon that provides an efficient but long range-capable means of getting to base camp and [...]
4 Feb. 2023
DARPA has chosen two radically different designs from teams led by General Atomics and Aurora Flight Systems for development of the Liberty Lifter Seaplane Wing-in-Ground Effect full-scale seaborne [...]
3 Feb. 2023
While short-range radio remote control may be fine for consumer drones, long-distance delivery drones often use cellular networks to communicate with their operators. A new mobile network system [...]
3 Feb. 2023
The sharpness of images on a MicroLED screen is limited by how tightly the pixels that make up the display are packed. MIT scientists have taken a unique approach to packing them much tighter, by [...]
3 Feb. 2023
Searching the galaxy for planets like Earth is a slow-going needle-in-a-haystack proposition. In fact, out of over 5,000 other planets discovered by astronomers to date, only about 12 even come [...]
3 Feb. 2023
Chinese e-mobility outfit Magicycle has launched what's it's calling an ebike SUV, a full-squish fat-tire electric mountain bike called the Deer that can also serve as a capable commuter and trekking [...]
3 Feb. 2023
MitchCraft Tiny Homes, which recently completed a very compact model, has also put the finishing touches to another towable dwelling that's far larger. Named Lisa's 30 x 10 Tiny Home, it features a [...]

The Infinite Monkey Cage

24 Dec. 2022
For this special Christmas episode, Brian Cox and Robin Ince visit the Australian Wine Research Institute in Adelaide to find out what science can teach us about wine. They are joined by stand-up [...]
17 Dec. 2022
Brian Cox and Robin Ince visit Canberra for the first of 4 special episodes recorded in Australia. This week they visit the amazing Canberra Deep Space Communication Centre where scientists [...]
10 Dec. 2022
Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian and author David Baddiel, psychologist Prof Karen Douglas, biologist Prof Matthew Cobb and philosopher Dr Timotheus Vermeulen to discover why [...]
3 Dec. 2022
Brian Cox and Robin Ince tackle the thorny issue of their own differing experiences of ageing, as they find out why Robin seems to be doing it so much more quickly than Brian and whether science [...]
26 Nov. 2022
Brian Cox and Robin Ince continue their LA science adventure as they visit Caltech in Pasadena to meet the scientists hunting for planets orbiting distant stars in solar systems far far from our [...]
19 Nov. 2022
The Infinite Monkey Cage teleports to California for this special episode recorded at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. They are joined by comedian and talk-show host Conan O'Brien, alongside JPL's [...]
12 Nov. 2022
Brian Cox and Robin Ince return for a new series with an illustrious panel of experts to discuss what scientists have learnt from Covid and what we have all learnt about the nature of science by [...]

The MIT Press Reader

2 Feb. 2023
While the meal in a pill remains a dream of science fiction, new and intriguing ideas continue to emerge.
30 Jan. 2023
The Czech writer’s darkly humorous novel, published in 1936, anticipated our current reality with eerie accuracy.
26 Jan. 2023
Architect and poet Paolo Belardi traces the many conditions and situations that have inspired extraordinary ideas across the arts and sciences.
23 Jan. 2023
In the landscape of madness, time lies open and exposed.
19 Jan. 2023
How Lebanon’s brutal civil war aborted a grand vision of social reform and the expansion of mental health care.
16 Jan. 2023
A poetic history of descents, both real and fictional.
12 Jan. 2023
Kathryn Hall, an expert on placebos, considers the ways that expectations and learning affect our response to them.

Harvard Science Book Talks

26 Jan. 2023
26 Jan. 2023
2 Dec. 2022
16 Nov. 2022
8 Nov. 2022
28 Oct. 2022
28 Oct. 2022

MIT OpenCourseWare

27 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023

Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures

20 Dec. 2022
17 Nov. 2022
9 Nov. 2022
12 Oct. 2022
22 Sep. 2022
19 May. 2022
17 Mar. 2022

YaleCourses

9 Jan. 2023
7 Dec. 2022
3 Dec. 2022
30 Nov. 2022
19 Nov. 2022
17 Nov. 2022
12 Nov. 2022

xkcd

3 Feb. 2023
1 Feb. 2023
30 Jan. 2023
27 Jan. 2023

Radiolab

3 Feb. 2023
We continue the story of a covert smuggling operation to bring abortion pills into Ukraine, shortly after the Russian invasion. In this episode, reporters Katz Laszlo and Gregory Warner go to [...]
27 Jan. 2023
You know the drill — all it takes is one sperm, one egg, and blammo — you’ve got yourself a baby. Right? Well, in this 2015 episode, conception takes on a new form — it’s the sperm and the [...]
20 Jan. 2023
In the weeks following the full-scale invasion of Ukraine, a young doctor in Germany sees that abortion pills are urgently needed in Ukraine. And she wants to help. But getting the drugs into the [...]
13 Jan. 2023
In this episode, first aired in 2011, we talk about the meaning of a good game — whether it's a pro football playoff, or a family showdown on the kitchen table. And how some games can make you [...]
6 Jan. 2023
For a special New Year’s treat, we take a tour through the history of the universe with the help of… poets. Our guide is Maria Popova, who writes the popular blog The Marginalian (formerly Brain [...]
30 Dec. 2022
This episode —first released in 2009 and then again in 2015, with an update — asks, what is “normal”? Maybe it exists, maybe not. We examine peace-loving baboons with Stanford neuroscientist [...]
23 Dec. 2022
At any given moment, nearly 500,000 people are crammed together in a metal tube, hurtling through the air. In this episode, we look at the strange human experiment that is flying together. Special [...]

The Marginalian

5 Feb. 2023
“The thought that we must die… is the reason we must live well.” “The mind is its own place, and in it self can make a Heav’n of Hell, a Hell of Heav’n,” Milton wrote in [...]
4 Feb. 2023
Sometimes, a painting in words is worth a thousand pictures. I think about this more and more, in our compulsively visual culture, which increasingly reduces what we think and feel and see — [...]
3 Feb. 2023
“The handicaps under which Dr. Turner’s work was accomplished were many, and were modestly and bravely met.” The son of a nurse and a church janitor, entomologist Charles Henry Turner [...]
1 Feb. 2023
How an ancient survivor of the unsurvivable became a triumph of the human spirit in a divided world. Sixty million years ago, when tropical climes covered the Arctic, a small redwood species [...]
31 Jan. 2023
“The true object of education, like that of every other moral process, is the generation of happiness. Happiness to the individual in the first place. If individuals were universally happy, the [...]
29 Jan. 2023
Living into the risk and responsibility of the multiple identities we carry. “If you don’t understand yourself you don’t understand anybody else,” the young poet Nikki Giovanni told the [...]
27 Jan. 2023
“The gifts of the inner world must be accepted as gifts in the outer world if they are to retain their vitality.” It is a gladness to be able to call one’s daily work a labor of [...]

BLDGBLOG

3 Jan. 2023
There was an article last year in the New York Times about a California start-up called Inversion that wants to “speed delivery of important items by storing them in orbit.” [Image: Collage by [...]
2 Jan. 2023
[Image: “Forest and Sun” (1946) by Max Ernst.] When I first saw this painting—“Forest and Sun” (1946) by Max Ernst, a composition and theme he continually revisited and changed over the [...]
11 Sep. 2022
[Image: Collage by BLDGBLOG of public domain images from NASA and the Library of Congress.] An opportunity to explore the use of muons as a tool for architectural and archaeological imaging came up [...]
24 Aug. 2022
[Image: “Solomon’s Pools & ancient aqueducts…,” via Library of Congress.] There’s a beautiful description over at New Scientist of a hypothetical new form of computing device, a [...]
14 Jun. 2022
[Image: From Kiessling’s Grosser Verkehrs-Plan von Berlin (1920).] It’s funny to be back in Berlin, a city where I once thought I’d spend the rest of my life, first arriving here as a [...]

Works in Progress

25 Jul. 2022
Happy summer from the Works in Progress team. We hope you are staying cool. In our new issue out today, we have articles on how to fix peer review, rescue our roads from cars, and use [...]
22 Apr. 2022
Calum Heath illustrates the cover for this issue. He is a freelance illustrator based in Oxford, UK. You can follow him on Instagram here. Hello from the Works in Progress team! In case you missed [...]
17 Feb. 2022
We are pleased to announce that Works in Progress has a new home at Stripe, where we’ll be teaming up with Stripe Press to further ideas for economic, scientific and technological advancement. In [...]

The Conversation

5 Feb. 2023
Caucusgoers stand beneath the sign for the South Carolina delegation at the Democratic National Convention. Bill Clark /CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty ImagesThe Democratic National Committee approved a [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Kate Winslet promoting 'Avatar: The Way of Water' in London in December 2022. Winslet held her breath for over seven minutes during filming of the movie. (Shutterstock)Kate Winslet reportedly [...]
5 Feb. 2023
As Canadians weigh the pros and cons of alcohol use, they should be thinking not just about the risks to their physical health, but also to their mental health. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian WyldNearly [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Canada is on the road to transformation in mobility. The federal government recently announced its zero-emission vehicle sales target, which requires all light-duty passenger vehicles sold by 2035 to [...]
5 Feb. 2023
Canada has a shortage of doctors. That's why making it difficult for internationally trained doctors to practise here is so mystifying. (Francisco Venancio, Unsplash)Internationally trained [...]
5 Feb. 2023
A flooded street in Lagos, Nigeria Wikimedia CommonsMany countries in Africa suffer from disasters annually, but the adverse effects are grossly under-reported compared with coverage of more [...]
5 Feb. 2023
South Africa's governing ANC has continued the anti-cannabis repression inherited from apartheid. shutterstockCannabis is being commercialised into a multibillion-dollar global industry and [...]

NASA: Image of the Day

3 Feb. 2023
This Jan. 10, 2013, composite image of the giant barred spiral galaxy NGC 6872 combines visible light images from the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope with far-ultraviolet data [...]
2 Feb. 2023
The waxing gibbous Moon stands out in this Jan. 2, 2023, image from the International Space Station as it orbited 269 miles above the southern Indian Ocean.
31 Jan. 2023
In this photo from Oct. 14, 2008, a great blue heron stands watch among a pond of water lilies on NASA's Kennedy Space Center.
30 Jan. 2023
Chile’s Villarrica volcano emits steam and other volcanic gases in this photo taken from the International Space Station on Jan. 17, 2023. The gases come from a series of minor explosions—called [...]
27 Jan. 2023
The bright variable star V 372 Orionis takes center stage in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
26 Jan. 2023
NASA Administrator Bill Nelson lays a wreath at the Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial.
25 Jan. 2023
On January 25, 1984, President Ronald Reagan used his State of the Union address to call for NASA to build a permanent manned space station.
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